Saturday, March 14, 2009

Welcome to the Re-Session

The Snowboarder Magazine ad staff just put together a week long "round table" with some of the most respectable members of the snowboard marketing community and I was lucky enough to be invited.  As Shaun White played in his own personal backcountry half-pipe just a few miles away, we discussed how to keep our industry alive and even more importantly, how we can keep our jobs.  On Day 2 the group had a collective epiphany: fire everybody and focus all marketing budgets on ourselves!  Welcome to "The Re-Session". Fuck you bitches!    

Here's a little sample of some of the hard work we put in last week, trying to save our industry..
video

Monday, February 16, 2009

Twig Pigs can suck it....

Think you're a bad-ass cuz you got ticketed jumping down a staircase?  Ha!  That's just local kid stuff, try getting a Federal Trespassing charge son, then talk to me.


Friday, February 13, 2009

Speeding up the balding process

Sending backcountry lines can be hazardous to your hairline.  Pash took a bit of a tumble down a sketchy chute yesterday and peeled a bit of his scalp back, no bigs...

DNA sample on the inside of Pash's balaclava

Hairline modification


video
Ouch

Sunday, February 1, 2009

taking it to the next level


I have done the impossible...... the cross joint no big deal.

Thursday, January 15, 2009

fucked up face


Yesterday i decided it would be sort of fun to go hit the new perfect rail by my house just for a little fun before heading to the resort.  turned out it was super icy and not that fun at all but this is what happened to me. check this pic, face to stairs dont feel to good.

Thursday, January 8, 2009

Party Mountain

Party time.....



Siebert examines some gnar from the chair.  Must have been cold, I can see his breath


Couple of eager beavers ripped these sick lines out of the cat accessed terrain real early 


Siebert bushwhacking; ollie to tree bonk.  He'd been looking at this line for 2 weeks

Lil-est nails his own sick line; ollie to double-rock to 5' drop... on a girl's board

One of our special guest stars for the day, Big Ev, getting radical

Take a hike buddy


Lil-est rides a chicks board, and he loves it.  Sneak peek at the 09/10 Rossignol Justice camber board 




Big Evs... Skeleton Crew son!!


Ladies and gentlemen, I give you AP Walker and "Big Mountain" Scott W. Arnold


Lil-est rolls some next level energy drink vectors; "liquid candy".  For real.


Apparently, that little spray wasn't quite doing it...


...that can't be good for you.


Sugar fueled snowball fight; Everybody against Lil-est!!!!





Tyler losing it.  This kid rocks a 16" stance and is better than you





Scene on the Powder Country Shuttle heading back up for more


Yeah nice Lil-est


How's that wet powder cuff feel


Pashley got a little art-faggy on the ride home... no big deal


Epic crew for an epic day of shred yet again at Powder Mountain.  Huge thanks to Carolyn Daniels and Dave Quackenbush, you guys rule.  (L to R) Tyler, Hadi, Pouch, Lil-est, Siebs, Provo, Evan, AP Walker, Vag-Arnie (Ian P missing from the shot)


Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Tragic Day at Snowbird

On Sunday, December 14, I went to Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort to shred some pow with friends.  Below is my first person account of what went down on our first run of the day, first run of the season for my friend Shawn...

Utah claims the "Greatest Snow on Earth" but this year it's been taking its time getting here.  So, like many Utah riders, when I looked at the weather maps and saw the pattern changing I knew this weekend was going to be epic.  With a quick call to the Snowbird report it looked like High Baldy was going to open for the first time this season.  So, after a long drive from Heber, stopping to pick up my friend Shawn Boyle and waiting in a long tram line we were ready to get some.  Up the short hike and out the traverse to an open zone that we had ridden maybe hundreds of times before; below us lay a narrow chute with flat tree zones on either side.  We were only there for a matter of minutes to regroup when suddenly a fracture some 2 feet deep and 40-50 feet wide ripped out merely feet away from us.  As the seemingly small and slow moving debris rolled down, it quickly gained momentum and mass, funneling itself through narrow spots and gaining strength as it fell.  We had noticed a couple skiing below us, the girl had either fallen and was collecting her gear or had gotten cliffed out and was hiking back up.  The debris struck her and swept her away without a trace.

Luckily, the highly experienced group we were with called on avalanche training and reacted quickly.  We started yelling for the victim and while the main part of our group made their way to the debris pile, I placed a call to the Snowbird ski patrol and joined the search.  We were notified by the victim's ski partner that she was not wearing a transceiver so we began probing the debris with anything we had: skis, boards and ski poles at first and then avalanche probes as the patrol came on scene.  After an hour of searching three distinct debris zones spread over three different elevations, a friend of mine felt a soft spot with his probe and quickly dug the victim out.  Unfortunately, after being down that long, and taking a hell of a violent ride down the entire face of High Baldy, she had stopped breathing.  The latest word that I've received was that the emergency crews had been able to resuscitate her but that sadly she had succumbed to her injuries a short time later.

The thing that struck me the deepest today was that accidents can happen to anyone, anywhere, anytime.  We were riding in-bounds, in an area where control work had been done and people had already ridden.  A spot that we all had ridden many times before.  There very easily could have been a half dozen of my bros caught up in this slide as well.  The only way to combat the unexpected is to be prepared.  Take an avalanche class, know the conditions you are riding, even if it's in-bounds and deemed safe, and know how to respond if an emergency does occur.  And get your riding buddies to learn along with you, it truly can save your life or that of your friends.

Monday, December 15, 2008